Rural Living

One reason your hay prices keep rising

Contrary Farmer Gene Logsdon highlights an alarming trend. The amount of hay going overseas is on a near straight-line trajectory. I once had a hay guy tell me his prices spiked because regional ranchers had exported their hay, which reduced our local supply, already under pressure from development. 

Overseas US hay sales 2007 through 2012

Read Gene Logsdon's full post on the true environmental and long-term costs of shipping out local hay.

Check out our photos of bringing in our own hay at Poudre River Stables.


'They tried to arrest me for planting carrots'

"If you want something changed, you have to stop waiting for someone else to do it. You are the change! This is your canvas, you should paint it. Your health, and the health of your community, is your responsibility and no one else’s."
- Ron Finley, urban farmer

Ron Finley's inspiring battle against unhealthy food started when he tried to buy tomatoes and their stickers said they were coated with shellac. Click here to read the full story.


And the bridge came a tumblin' down

It's official. The N. Shields St. - Poudre River bridge in Fort Collins came down today. The jack-hammering took all day, but in the end the last piece of the bridge quietly caved. I wonder what the Father of Fort Collins would say. You can still get to our place from the south.

Shields bridge down etc 074 (800x450)
The west side of the N. Shields St. - Poudre River bridge in Fort Collins went down earlier in the day.

Hardy folk can still make it to our stable

Driveway - N. Shields St. - new sewer line project - Poudre River Stables - Fort Collins - Colorado - 80521
A sharp right around Big Orange here will get you into our driveway. Clients are also able to access the property from our locked entrance at the Poudre River.
N. Shields St. demolition - new sewer line - road widening - Fort Collins - Colorado - 80521
The obstacle course on the way to our stable, just after the "road closed" signs at Shields and Vine streets.


N. Shields St. - demolition - new sewer line - road widening - Poudre River Stables - Fort Collins - Colorado - 80521

 

 

Dell the horse watches N. Shields construction - riverside pens - Poudre River Stables - Fort Collins - Colorado - 80521
My horse watches N. Shields construction from the riverside pens at our stable.

Read also:

Deer pick through Shields demolition

NW Fort Collins a hotbed of activity ...


Trees: There one minute, gone the next

N. Shields St., Fort Collins, Colorado, October 11, 2014

Trees - N. Shields St. - Fort Collins - Colorado - 80521 - Fall - 2014

 January 7, 2014:

Silver maple being cut down - N. Shields St. - Fort Collins - Colorado - 80521

January 8, 2014:

Trees being cut down - N. Shields St. - Fort Collins - Colorado - 80521

Trying to imagine all the fruit trees I can plant when this is all over.

What you see is all part of the North Shields Corridor Improvement Project and a recent city plan to add sewer to N. Shields St. The hazardous above-ground utility lines on the right side of the photo, below, will move across the street. These lines went down twice in almost this exact spot last year, and above-ground lines went down two streets west of us on Christmas Day 2014, knocking out power to this area for many hours. Even though the city has made accommodations for other underground work that could also house Xcel's new utility lines, I am told that Xcel has chosen to again build lines above ground. Inquiries to Xcel have received no reply. As you enjoy the new sidewalks and bike trails, keep an eye on the power lines overhead and next to you.

Raccoons jumped out of trees and sat inside trees as they went down. Last spring, one tree had a bee hive in it.

Trees being cut down - N. Shields St. - Fort Collins - Colorado - 80521

 

Read also: Fort Collins sewer line heads north


Without irrigation, only sagebrush

Acres of worthless sagebrush next to a productive field illustrate the difference irrigation made to Colorado's history and economy. As the sagebrush gave way to agriculture, so did the horse and buggy. With its space for one-cent postage, this Denver-publisher postcard dates to 1872, according to Webfooters Postcard Club.

Read also:

Lost messages: Postcards show importance of horses

Gruesome end for Father of Fort Collins; historic farm 

Sagebrush to irrigation - horses - buggy - Colorado irrigation history - circa 1872 - postcard calls for 1 cent postage

Sagebrush to irrigation - postcard back - calls for 1 cent postage - circa 1872


Fort Collins sewer line heads north

Update Jan. 5, 2015, copy of Dec. 18 letter to Xcel managers asking for new utility lines to go underground: Download Copy of letter sent to Xcel managers.pdf (158.4K)

Update Christmas Day, 2014: Xcel above-ground power lines go down to the west of us

Our place, Poudre River Stables, sits in the background south of the river as city workers install diversion pipes that will let them send a new sewer line under the river bed north on N. Shields St. toward Hwy. 287.

Read also: NW area turns into hotbed of activity as Fort Collins warms up to Poudre River Downtown Project

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And now comes the sewer line

What started out as a new bridge plus bike trails and sidewalks on either side of N. Shields St. down to the Poudre River has grown to include a complete sewer line. Larimer County plans an open house 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18 in the courthouse offices building. See The Coloradoan story for more details.

Read also: NW area turns into hotbed of activity as Fort Collins warms up to Poudre River Downtown Project


History lovers to converge on Fort Collins 150th birthday exhibit at Discovery museum tonight

If you ever wondered about this town you live in, tonight at 5:30 would be a good time to catch up on Fort Collins' 150 years of history as the Discovery museum launches its "FC150" exhibit. I am personally thrilled because our place was the homestead of a very important guy in the city's history, and will be part of the many personal stories featured by the museum. This is a party you don't want to miss. Get more details on the exhibit from The Coloradoan story. Cost: Adult admission is $9.50; $7 for seniors and students; $6 for children ages 3 to 12; free for members and those ages 2 and younger.